1. ‘And so about this tomb of mine’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, consider the ways in which the idea of posterity is explored in ‘A Bishop Orders his Tomb at St Praxted’s Church’, commenting on Browning’s treatment of this theme in other poems.

2. ‘Burns, Shelley were with us, - they watch from their graves’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, explore Browning’s presentation of intense experience in ‘The Lost Leader’. Does he treat this theme in a similar or different way in other poems?

3. ‘Tastes sweet the water with such specks of earth?’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, consider Browning’s presentation of conflict in ‘Pictor Ignotus’. Is his presentation of this theme more or less effective here than in other poems from the selection?

4. ‘Sure of heaven as sure can be’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, consider the ways in which ‘Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister’ treats the theme of moral hypocrisy. How does Browning make this his focus in other poems from the selection?

5. 'Oh heart! O blood that freezes, blood that burns!’ Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, consider the ways in which human love is presented in ‘Love among the ruins’, relating it to Browning’s handling of this theme in other poems from the selection.

6. ‘It’s a horror to think of’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, consider the ways in which Browning makes use of the grotesque in ‘Up at a Villa, Down in a City’. In what other ways does he make use of this device in other poems from the selection?

7. ‘Must a little weep, Love’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, consider Browning’s use of pathos in ‘A Woman’s Last Word’, commenting also on how he makes it his focus in other poems from the selection.

8. ‘I triumph o’er a secret wrung from nature’s close reserve’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, explore Browning’s presentation of the theme of discovery and exploration in ‘A Toccata of Galuppi’s’, relating it to his handling of this theme in other poems.

9. ‘Such closets to search, such alcoves to importune’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, consider the ways in which the private sphere is presented in ‘Love in a Life/Life in a Love’. Does Browning explore this theme more or less effectively here than in other poems from the selection?

10. ‘Dear rose, thy term is reached’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, consider the ways in which decay is presented in ‘Women and Roses’. In what ways does Browning make this theme his focus in other poems from the selection?

11. ‘The pain of finite hearts that yearn’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, consider the ways in which the theme of human limitation is presented in ‘Two in the Campagna’, bringing out the ways in which it relates to other poems from the selection.

12. ‘Till lo, the little touch, and youth was gone! ’ Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, consider the ways in which ‘A Grammarian’s Funeral’ explores the theme of regret. Where else in the selection is this Browning’s focus?

13. ‘How did it happen my poor boy?’ Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, consider the ways in which the passage of time is explored in ‘Apparent Failure’, commenting also on Browning’s treatment of this theme in other poems from the selection.

14. ‘I was ever a fighter, so – one fight more’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, explore Browning’s presentation of the theme of heroism in ‘Prospice’, bringing out ways in which it relates to his handling of this theme in other poems from the selection.

15. ‘Ensconce/In luxury’s sofa-lap of leather’. Making close reference to language, imagery and verse form, explore Browning’s exploration of the concept of pleasure in ‘Dubiety’. Where else in the selection is this his focus?